Ti2-LAPP Modular Illumination System

  1. Key Features
  2. Sample Images

DMD/dual color TIRF image

Drosophila S2 cells expressing EOS-tagged tubulin. Three ROIs of different shapes (horizontal rectangle; vertical rectangle; circle) were simultaneously photoconverted using the DMD module and 405 nm LED light. Multiple, custom ROIs for photoconversion were easily set using NIS-Elements. A fast, dual color TIRF image to track the converted and unconverted proteins were achieved by using two TIRF illuminators. The H-TIRF illuminator was used for imaging the converted proteins (561 nm excitation, red) and a manual TIRF illuminator for imaging the unconverted proteins (488 nm excitation, green). The TIRF angles were optimized for each wavelength using the two independent illuminators. The use of multiple TIRF illuminators enables fast, multi-angle TIRF imaging as well as anisotropy experiments.

Image courtesy of Michael Winding and Dr. Vladimir Gelfand, Northwestern University Medical School

DMD/dual color TIRF image

A Drosophila S2 cell expressing EOS-tagged tubulin. A short segment of a microtubule bundle was photoconverted using the DMD module and 405 nm LED light. Time-lapse image of the photoconverted tubulin (red) and unconverted tubulin (green) using dual color-TIRF were acquired with the H-TIRF illuminator. Image shows rapid movement of the photoconverted microtubules.

Image courtesy of Drs. Nico Stuurman and Ron Vale, University of California, San Francisco

H-TIRF/FRAP/Epi-FL images

A small region in a GFP-tagged tubulin expressing Drosophila S2 cell was photobleached using the FRAP module to analyze the motility of microtubules. Both H-TIRF and epi-fluorescence illuminators were used to image the recovery dynamics in TIRF (middle) and widefield (right) (shown in red and green, respectively, in the left image).

Image courtesy of Drs. Nico Stuurman and Ron Vale, University of California, San Francisco

Dual color H-TIRF image

An in vitro preparation of fluorescently-labeled microtubules (Alexa 647) and dynein (tetramethylrhodamine) was imaged as a time series using the H-TIRF illuminator. Single molecules of dynein (in green) can be visualized moving along microtubules shown in red.

Image courtesy of Dr Ron Vale, University of California, San Francisco

  • *This movie clip is a loop sequence which repeats five times.

Three-color H-TIRF image

An in vitro preparation of fluorescently-labeled microtubules (tetramethylrhodamine and Alexa 647) and tubulin binding proteins (Alexa 488) was imaged using the H-TIRF illuminator and the gradation ND filter. Incident angles can be automatically adjusted for multiple wavelengths. The image shows the movement of the microtubule binding protein tracking the growing end of the microtubule (green dot).

Image courtesy of Melissa Hendershott and Dr. Ron Vale, University of California, San Francisco

Related Products